Announcing the 2016 ALTA Travel Fellowship Recipients!

ALTA TRAVEL FELLOWSHIPS AWARDED!
– $1,000 to emerging translators working from
– Fellows reading at ALTA39: Translation & Crossings (October 6-9, 2016 in Oakland, CA)

ALTA is pleased to announce the winners of the 2016 ALTA Travel Fellowships, including the very first Peter K. Jansen Memorial Travel Fellowship. Each year, ALTA provides four to six $1,000 fellowships to emerging translators to attend the annual ALTA conference. This year’s winners were selected by Cathy Nelson, Katie Silver, Sarah Stickney, and Matvei Yankelevich. Congratulations to these exceptional emerging translators, chosen from more than 140 applications:

Bruna Dantas Lobato, 2016 Peter K. Jansen Memorial Travel Fellow (Brazilian Portuguese)
Bruna Dantas Lobato’s writings and translations have appeared in BOMB, Ploughshares online, The Millions, Words Without Borders, Asymptote, and elsewhere. She is the Fiction Editor of Washington Square Review and an MFA candidate in Fiction at New York University, where she teaches creative writing. She is originally from Natal, Brazil. Read more about Bruna here.

Monika Cassel, 2016 ALTA Travel Fellow (German)
Monika Cassel is a translator, poet, and educator. Her translations have appeared in POETRY Magazine, Michigan Quarterly Review, Guernica, and Asymptote; her forthcoming chapbook won the 2015 Venture Poetry Award. She holds a PhD in comparative literature from the University of Michigan and teaches German at Oregon State University. Read more about Monika here.

Nicholas Glastonbury, 2016 ALTA Travel Fellow (Turkish)
Nicholas Glastonbury is a translator and writer based in Brooklyn. He is a PhD student in cultural anthropology at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, and is also a co-editor of the Turkey Page for the e-zine Jadaliyya. Read more about Nicholas here.

Haider Shahbaz, 2016 ALTA Travel Fellow (Urdu)
Haider Shahbaz has a B.A. from Yale University and an MFA from University of Nevada, Las Vegas. His translations have appeared in Brooklyn Rail, Portland Review, Aldus, and elsewhere. His work has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. Starting in October, he will be the Charles Pick Fellow at University of East Anglia. Read more about Haider here.

Kelsi Vanada, 2016 ALTA Travel Fellow (Spanish)
Kelsi Vanada is pursuing an MFA in Literary Translation at the University of Iowa and holds an MFA in Poetry from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop (2016). She writes poems, and translates poetry from Spanish and the Scandinavian languages. She won Asymptote’s 2016 Close Approximations Translation Contest. Recent work at Asymptote, New Delta Review, and Prelude. Read more about Kelsi here.

As part of ALTA39: Translation & Crossings, October 6-9, 2016 in Oakland, CA, there will be a Fellows Reading on Friday, October 7 from 5:15pm – 6:45pm. More information on the conference is available at www.literarytranslators.org/alta39.

The mentor for the 2016 ALTA Travel Fellows is Elizabeth Harris.

More details about ALTA Travel Fellowships available at http://literarytranslators.org/awards/alta-travel-fellowships.

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Announcing the 2016 Lucien Stryk Asian Translation Prize Shortlist!

The American Literary Translators Association (ALTA) is delighted to announce the 5-title shortlist for the 2016 Lucien Stryk Asian Translation Prize. Lucien Stryk was an internationally acclaimed translator of Japanese and Chinese Zen poetry, renowned Zen poet himself, and former professor of English at Northern Illinois University. The Lucien Stryk Asian Translation Prize recognizes the importance of Asian translation for international literature and promotes the translation of Asian works into English. This year’s judges are Steve Bradbury, Eleanor Goodman, and Kendall Heitzman.

The award-winning book and translator for 2016 will receive a $5,000 cash prize, and the award will be announced during ALTA’s annual conference, ALTA39: Translation & Crossings, held this year at the Marriott Oakland City Center in Oakland, CA from October 6-9, 2016. If you can’t join us in person, follow our Twitter (@LitTranslate) and Facebook (www.facebook.com/literarytranslators) for the announcement of the winners!

We’ll be featuring each of these shortlist titles on the ALTA blog with reviews written by the judges: www.literarytranslators.org/blog.

The 2016 Lucien Stryk Prize Shortlist (in alphabetical order by title):

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I Am a Season that Does Not Exist in the World
By Kim Kyung Ju
Translated from the Korean by Jake Levine
(Black Ocean)

zi_coverRipened Wheat: Selected Poems of Hai Zi
By Hai Zi
Translated from the Chinese by Ye Chun
(The Bitter Oleander Press)

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The Collected Poems of Chika Sagawa

By Chika Sagawa
Translated from the Japanese by Sawako Nakayasu
(Canarium Books)


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The Late Poems of Wang An-Shih

By Wang An-Shih
Translated from the Chinese by David Hinton
(New Directions)


these_things_here_and_now_coverThese Things Here and Now: Poetic Responses to the March 11, 2011 Disasters

By various poets
Translated from the Japanese by Jeffrey Angles
(Josai University Educational Corporation University Press)

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Announcing the 2016 Italian Prose in Translation Award (IPTA) Shortlist!

The American Literary Translators Association (ALTA) is delighted to announce the shortlist for the 2016 Italian Prose in Translation Award. Starting in 2015, the Italian Prose in Translation Award (IPTA) recognizes the importance of contemporary Italian prose (fiction and literary non-fiction) and promotes the translation of Italian works into English. This prize is awarded annually to a translator of a recent work of Italian prose (fiction or literary non-fiction). This year’s judges are Michael Moore, Jamie Richards, and Russell Valentino.

The award-winning book and translator for 2016 will receive a $5,000 cash prize, and the award will be announced during ALTA’s annual conference, ALTA39: Translation & Crossings, held this year at the Marriott Oakland City Center in Oakland, CA from October 6-9, 2016. If you can’t join us in person, follow our Twitter (@LitTranslate) and Facebook (www.facebook.com/literarytranslators) for the announcement of the winners!

We’ll be featuring each of these shortlist titles on the ALTA blog with reviews written by the judges: www.literarytranslators.org/blog.

The 2016 Italian Prose in Translation Shortlist (in alphabetical order by title):

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Hollow Heart

By Viola Di Grado
Translated from the Italian by Antony Shugaar
(Europa Editions)

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The Story of the Lost Child

By Elena Ferrante
Translated from the Italian by Ann Goldstein
(Europa Editions)

tristano_dies_coverTristano Dies: A Life
By Antonio Tabucchi
Translated from the Italian by Elizabeth Harris
(Archipelago Books)

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2016 ALTA Travel Fellow: Kelsi Vanada

Kelsi Vanada, 2016 ALTA Travel Fellow (Spanish)kelsi-vanada-headshot

Kelsi Vanada is studying Literary Translation in the MFA program at the University of Iowa, and will graduate in the spring. She came to translation by way of her involvement with the International Writing Program (IWP) at the University of Iowa, while she was studying poetry in the Writers’ Workshop (MFA, 2016). This means that her first experiences with translation were in the context of working closely with visiting writers-in-residency to bring their poems into English. Collaboration is still an important part of any translation project for Kelsi.

Kelsi grew up outside of Denver, Colorado, where she studied English and Spanish at the University of Denver. An important part of her undergraduate career was the semester she spent studying in Copenhagen through DIS, the Danish Institute for Study Abroad. While there, Kelsi lived with her Danish family members, learned Danish, and learned as much as possible about the Scandinavian cultures. Following graduation, Kelsi lived another semester abroad while teaching English as a foreign language in Calama, Chile, through the program Inglés Abre Puertas (English Opens Doors).

After teaching Spanish, writing, and poetry in Denver for four years in a K-8 school, Kelsi was accepted to the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, and felt that for the first time she could call herself a poet and focus fully on her love of creative writing. With her interest in languages, translating the poetry of other language writers seems like a natural next step for Kelsi after studying poetry. She is grateful to have worked under the direction of Nataša Ďurovičová, editor for the IWP (where Kelsi now works as a research assistant), and Aron Aji, head of the MFA in Literary Translation.

Kelsi’s translations of poems by Venezuela poet Natasha Tinacos (IWP, 2014) can be found in Berfrois. Kelsi is currently translating the book La edad de merecer [The Eligible Age] (La Bella Varsovia, 2015) by Spanish poet Berta García Faet; the translation will be published by Song Bridge Press in spring 2017. Faet’s work is feminist, formally innovative, and tradition-breaking—a new kind of confessional poetry that makes poignant the poet’s experience as a female writer.

Kelsi’s other project is a continuation of a translation project started last fall with IWP visiting writer Marie Silkeberg from Sweden. Together they translated a series of poems, “The Cities,” from Silkeberg’s book Till Damaskus [To Damascus] (Albert Bonniers Förlag, 2014). These translations won the Asymptote “Close Approximations” contest, judged by Michael Hofmann, in April. It was a great honor, and inspired Kelsi to continue translating the rest of the book with Silkeberg. Till Damaskus was written with Silkeberg’s collaborator, the Syrian-born Palestinian poet Ghayath Almadhoun, as a way of processing the events of the Arab Spring. Hybrid in form and dense in sound, the poems take on questions of immigrant identity, memory, and loss.  

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2016 ALTA Travel Fellow: Haider Shahbaz

Haider Shahbaz, 2016 ALTA Travel Fellow (Urdu)haider-shahbaz

Being from Pakistan – a country where both English and Urdu are official languages, and where a host of regional languages are commonly spoken – Haider learned the importance of translation early in his life. His childhood memories include his grandmother reciting Punjabi verses from the popular romance, Heer Ranjha, his father telling stories of Amir Hamza in Urdu, and his uncle mesmerizing him with Grimms’ fairy tales, reading out loud from a colorfully illustrated English version. As a result, he never saw translation as a skill to be acquired, but rather as a reality to be lived every day.

When he left Pakistan at the age of sixteen to finish high school in Britain, his ability to translate became even more pertinent, allowing him to move across geographic boundaries in addition to linguistic ones. He continued to read in multiple languages, discovering Orwell at the same time as Manto, Toni Morrison along with Bano Qudsia. Literature became, for him, a way of living between languages, and with them, identities.

Later, he came to America to study at Yale University. Seeing the misinformed and irresponsible way in which Islam was often translated for an American audience, he found it increasingly necessary to pay attention to the ethical questions that informed the role of translation, not simply the aesthetic questions. He began to understand how the task of translation – the task, in other words, of negotiating difference – was central to the way cultures imagined gender, race, and nationality.

His general interest in the way societies and individuals engaged translation turned into a more concrete interest in literary translation, specifically the translation of Urdu prose and poetry into English, when he joined the MFA program at University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Guided by generous teachers and encouraged by a MFA program that prioritized translation, he focused on the work of contemporary Urdu writers who are often ignored unlike English-language writers from the region.

His first translated novel, Hassan’s State of Affairs by Mirza Athar Baig, will be published next year. The experimental novel follows a group of surrealist filmmakers in their effort to capture Pakistan. The opening chapter of the novel was published in Brooklyn Rail, and was nominated for a Pushcart Prize. Other translations have appeared in Portland Review, Aldus, and 3quarksdaily. His critical work has appeared in Los Angeles Review of Books, Jadaliyya, Himal SouthAsian, The Believer Logger, and Tanqeed. Starting in October, he will be the Charles Pick Fellow at University of East Anglia in Norwich, UK.

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