Malinda A. Markham Translation Prize Open for Submissions

Are you sitting on a manuscript of poetry in translation? This could be your chance! The Malinda A. Markham Translation Prize from Saturnalia Books is considering manuscripts translated by female-identifying translators of female-identifying poets.

This translation prize honors the life and work of award-winning poet and translator Malinda A. Markham. 

The prize includes $2,000 and publication! The manuscript must be a length of 48-120 pages of translated poems (not including foreword material).

See the full guidelines and submit by October 31 here: https://saturnaliabooks.com/poetry-prize/translation/

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Announcing the Winner of the 2021 National Translation Award in Poetry: Allegria

October 16, 2021—The American Literary Translators Association (ALTA) is pleased to announce the winner of the 2021 National Translation Award (NTA) in Poetry! 2021 marks the twenty-third year for the NTA, and the seventh year to award separate prizes in poetry and prose. The NTA, which is administered by ALTA, is the only national award for translated fiction, poetry, and literary nonfiction that includes a rigorous examination of both the source text and its relation to the finished English work. This year’s judges for poetry are Sinan Antoon, Layla Benitez-James, and Sibelan Forrester.

This year’s winner was awarded at the ALTA’s 44th annual conference, Inflection Points, held jointly virtually and in-person in Tucson, AZ. The ceremony was held virtually, and included a focus on the 2021 shortlist, presented by judge Sibelan Forrester, and the winner was featured in conversation with her and then conducted a brief reading. The announcement will be viewable on the ALTA Crowdcast channel. The winner will be awarded a $2,500 prize.

Winner: 2021 National Translation Award in Poetry

Allegria
By Giuseppe Ungaretti
Translated from Italian by Geoffrey Brock
(Archipelago Books)

From the judges:

Ungaretti’s first book-length collection of poems appeared almost a century ago. It transformed modern Italian poetry and announced the arrival of a unique voice in world poetry. Although conceived when he was fighting in the trenches of WWI, and penned on military postcards, blank spaces in letters, and the margins of newspapers, these poems are the antithesis of war and what it stands for. The slender poems celebrate life, inflecting its light, memory, and mystery, and seizing the eternal from the seemingly ephemeral in vivid and striking imagery. This elegant translation preserves Ungaretti’s economy and his pursuit of poetic purity.

Geoffrey Brock is the author of three books of poems, the editor of The FSG Book of Twentieth-Century Italian Poetry, and the translator of numerous books of prose, poetry, and comics, most recently Last Dream by Giovanni Pascoli (World Poetry Books, 2019) and Allegria by Giuseppe Ungaretti (Archipelago, 2020). His awards include fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Guggenheim Foundation, the Academy of American Poets, and the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers. He teaches in the MFA Program in Creative Writing and Translation at the University of Arkansas, where he founded The Arkansas International.

The 2022 National Translation Award in Poetry submissions portal will be opened in January 2022.

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Announcing the Winner of the 2021 National Translation Award in Prose: No Presents Please

October 16, 2021—The American Literary Translators Association (ALTA) is pleased to announce the winner of the 2021 National Translation Award (NTA) in Prose! 2021 marks the twenty-third year for the NTA, and the seventh year to award separate prizes in poetry and prose. The NTA, which is administered by ALTA, is the only national award for translated fiction, poetry, and literary nonfiction that includes a rigorous examination of both the source text and its relation to the finished English work. This year’s judges for prose are Jennifer Croft, Anton Hur, and Annie Janusch.

This year’s winner was awarded at the ALTA’s 44th annual conference, Inflection Points, held jointly virtually and in-person in Tucson, AZ. The ceremony was held virtually, and included a focus on the 2021 shortlist, presented by judge Anton Hur, and the winner was featured in conversation with him and then conducted a brief reading. The announcement will be viewable on the ALTA Crowdcast channel. The winner will be awarded a $2,500 prize.

Winner: 2021 National Translation Award in Prose

No Presents Please: Mumbai Stories
By Jayant Kaikini
Translated from Kannada by Tejaswini Niranjana
(Catapult)

From the judges:

No Presents Please deserves all the presents for its intimate and life-affirming portrayal of ordinary people in Mumbai. This collection of short stories features a range of people, from a modest shop owner who passes on his late parents’ love, to a Bollywood stunt artist about to take to the air one more time. Each story is a perfectly crafted world where the unexpected suddenly expands the reader’s horizons in a single thrilling and affecting moment. Jayant Kaikini’s generous vision combines with Tejaswini Niranjana’s virtuoso translation to create a reading experience that is distinctly of its place, and profoundly universal at the same time.

Tejaswini Niranjana is a cultural theorist and translator. She is author of Siting Translation: History, Post- Structuralism and the Colonial Context, and several other academic books. She has curated the Saath-Saath Project, a set of collaborations between Indian and Chinese musicians, and produced three documentary films relating to music. For her translations from Kannada into English, she has been awarded the Central Sahitya Akademi Award, the State Sahitya Akademi Award, and the JCB Prize for South Asian Literature.

The 2022 National Translation Award in Prose submissions portal will be opened in January 2022.

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Announcing the Winner of the 2021 Lucien Stryk Asian Translation Prize: Endless Song

October 16, 2021—The American Literary Translators Association (ALTA) is pleased to announce the winner of the 2021 Lucien Stryk Asian Translation Prize! This prize, which was inaugurated in 2009, recognizes the importance of Asian translation for international literature and promotes the translation of Asian works into English. This year’s judges are Jeffrey Angles, Maithreyi Karnoor, and Rajiv Mohabir.

This year’s winner was awarded at the ALTA’s 44th annual conference, Inflection Points, held jointly virtually and in-person in Tucson, AZ. The ceremony was held virtually, and included a focus on the 2021 shortlist, presented by ALTA Vice-President Anne O. Fisher, and the winner was featured in conversation with her and then conducted a brief reading. The announcement will be viewable on the ALTA Crowdcast channel. The winner will be awarded a $6,000 prize.

Winner: 2021 Lucien Stryk Asian Translation Prize

Endless Song
By Nammāḻvār
Translated from Tamil by Archana Venkatesan 
(Penguin Random House India)

From the judges:

Endless Song is Archana Venkatesan’s monumental translation of the Tiruvāymoḻi, one of India’s most enduring Bhakti poetic texts. Over the course of 1,102 intricately wrought stanzas, the 9th-century Tamil poet Nammāḻvār sings of his dizzying, ecstatic love for the always-present, yet always-elusive divine. Thanks to Venkatesan’s more than three decades of work on this project, this important text now sings to us in the English-speaking world as well. In south India, this work is not just read and studied on the page, but also performed in communal readings. It is therefore appropriate that Venkatesan has crafted a translation that one can experience not only as a well-annotated, definitive work of scholarship, but also as a living, breathing work of contemporary poetry, too.   

Archana Venkatesan is Professor of Religious Studies and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Davis. She studies text, visuality, and performance in Tamil speaking South India, with a focus on the early-medieval period. Her translations are inspired by extensive fieldwork in the temples of Tamilnadu, where Tamil devotional poetry continues to be read, recited, and relished. Guided by the principles of Indic interpretive practices, she performs her translations with noted South Indian classical vocalist, Sikkil Gurucharan. Archana is the recipient of fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Endowment for the Arts, the American Institute of Indian Studies and Fulbright. She was a UC Davis Chancellor’s Fellow from 2014-2019.

The 2022 Lucien Stryk Asian Translation Prize submissions portal will be opened in January 2022.

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Announcing the Winner of the 2021 Italian Prose in Translation Award: Diary of a Foreigner in Paris

October 16, 2021—The American Literary Translators Association (ALTA) is pleased to announce the winner of the 2021 Italian Prose in Translation Award! Starting in 2015, the Italian Prose in Translation Award (IPTA) recognizes the importance of contemporary Italian prose (fiction and literary non-fiction) and promotes the translation of Italian works into English. This prize is awarded annually to a translator of a recent work of Italian prose (fiction or literary non-fiction). This year’s judges are Stiliana Milkova, Minna Zallman Proctor, and Will Schutt.

This year’s winner was awarded at the ALTA’s 44th annual conference, Inflection Points, held jointly virtually and in-person in Tucson, AZ. The ceremony was held virtually, and included a focus on the 2021 shortlist, presented by judge Stiliana Milkova. Because the winner could not be present, he recorded a statement and reading. The announcement will be viewable on the ALTA Crowdcast channel. The winner will be awarded a $5,000 prize.

Winner: 2021 Italian Prose in Translation Award

Diary of a Foreigner in Paris
By Curzio Malaparte
Translated from Italian and French by Stephen Twilley
(NYRB)

From the judges:

Stephen Twilley has given us a pitch-perfect translation of Curzio Malaparte’s unfinished chronicle of his stay in France and Switzerland in 1947 and 1948. As Malaparte writes in his preface, the diary is “a theatrical work brought to the boards of the page,” more fabulist than factual, overlain with unforgettable scenes, brief sketches, tall tales, and sweeping (at times dubious) pronouncements on the character of the French and the emergence of a new breed of European after the war. Diary of a Foreigner in Paris also presents readers with a memorable portrait of the diarist: a complicated figure, a former fascist who professes his antifascism, a social butterfly who prefers the company of dogs, a war correspondent who likes nothing better than a good story. As Edmund White points out in his inspired introduction, Malaparte may have been less important for his ideas than for his gifts as a sentence-maker; whether he is commenting on the blotting paper Proust wrote on (“a pale stain of India ink…a shadowy embroidery of branches, a forest in a fog”) or skewering the manners of Sartre’s followers (“those of a new, artificial bohemianism, which proposes to replace principles with slovenliness, ideas with a sweater”), Malaparte, in Twilley’s finely wrought translation, is delicious to read.

Stephen Twilley is a freelance copyeditor and literary translator. From 2013 to 2021 he was managing editor of the online review Public Books, where he also served a term as section editor for literature in translation. His own translations from the Italian include Francesco Pacifico’s The Story of My Purity, Marina Mander’s The First True Lie, Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa’s The Professor and the Siren, and Curzio Malaparte’s Diary of a Foreigner in Paris. Among his current translation projects is the definitive biography of Malaparte, by Maurizio Serra. He lives with his wife and son in Chicago.

The 2022 Italian Prose in Translation Award submissions portal will be opened in January 2022.

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