CFP: NEMLA Translating the Past

Call for papers: New England Modern Languages Association 2015
NeMLA 2015
Toronto, ON, Canada; April 30-May 3, 2015)

Translating the Past: Studies in the Transmission of Literature Across Time and Space

The translation of non-contemporary literary texts highlights a number of difficulties that are distinct from the problems of translation of contemporary texts. This panel will explore cases in which the translation of a text is separated from the source text by significant amounts of time, whether significant for length or for historical events. The work of many translation studies scholars, following the lead of Gideon Toury and the descriptive turn, focuses on translation as a process and translations as cultural artifacts of the target, or receiving culture. This prompts a number of questions in regard to translations that are historically distant from their source texts. How does chronology affect the significance of these processes or artifacts? How does the translation of historical texts constitute a form of historiography? How are current practices of history reflected in translation? What is the cultural effect of layers of re-translations of a single text? Proposals are welcome that deal with modern or historical translations, so long as the object of translation is temporally (as well as linguistically) distant from the moment of translation. Preference will be given to proposals that situate their analysis within the framework of contemporary translation studies or that address particular aspects of current translation studies discourse.

Please feel free to distribute this CfP; apologies as always for duplicate postings.  For questions contact Anna Strowe atastrowe@complit.umass.edu

Anna Strowe
Lecturer in Translation and Interpreting Studies
The University of Manchester

This entry was posted in Calls, Conferences and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s